Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Ruger 10/22 Takedown Rifle - Review


Lately I’ve noticed a lot of interest in, and had many questions directed my way, regarding Ruger’s newest 10/22 Takedown, so I thought it was time for another gun review.

Perfect for target practice, plinking, small game hunting, and even competitive shooting, the .22 long rifle is one of the world’s most popular calibers. With such popularity, almost every firearm manufacturer has introduced their own concept of a .22 long rifle throughout the years. With all the different styles and variations on the .22 long rifle caliber, a person could easily assume that there wasn’t hardly any room left on the market for something new.

However, Ruger’s 10/22 Takedown model has piqued the interest of industry professionals and the general public alike. Offering the reliability and the tradition of Ruger’s 10/22 model in a durable and compact takedown option, this little rifle does not disappoint. The takedown split occurs just in front of the receiver, and allows for the removal of the barrel and fore-end for easy storage and travel. Ruger has even provided its own black nylon storage bag and the package comes complete with safety lock, manual, scope mount rail and 10 round magazine.

Made of steel alloy and a synthetic, black stock, the 10/22 Takedown weighs in at 4.67 lbs. It has a barrel length of 16.62” and an overall length of 36.25.” One initial concern with takedown models is the wear and tear, or play, that can occur between the two separate halves. With its simple locking mechanism, it takes less than two seconds to join together or take apart, and the connection is secure and strong. Many people who shy away from takedown models because of flimsiness or lack of sturdiness can be assured that the 10/22 Takedown feels just as solid and secure as the conventional 10/22 models.

The biggest concern of any takedown model is whether the point of impact will change between disassembly and reassembly. In testing this rifle, we found no considerable change in point of impact. It is recommended in the manual, that after each assembly, you should let the bolt slam shut on an empty chamber to “set” the barrel. It is important to note that when assembling or disassembling this rifle to always remember to lock the bolt back in the open position, otherwise damage could occur to the bolt and/or shell extractor.  
Although a scope mount rail is provided, this rifle does come ready to go with a brass bead front sight and an adjustable rear folding leaf sight. Unlike our other .22 long rifles, we chose not to mount a

Note: Rifle only comes with a 10 round capacity magazine. Higher capacity magazines, like the one shown here, are available though.
 
scope and instead test it with open sites – basically testing its readiness straight out of the box. Initial accuracy was good, although point of impact was high and to the right (for this particular rifle). After some adjustments we were shooting offhand sub one inch groups. The rifle functioned flawlessly with no discernible hang-ups in regards to chambering or ejection. A clean trigger break just put the cherry on top.
 

Rugged, weather-resistant and fast-handling, this .22 takedown rifle would be right at home in the woods targeting barking bushy-tails or in the field taking aim at rabbits. With all the accuracy and reliability that this model offers, it is a good option for youth interested in learning about firearms and/or shooting. Overall, it is simply a great option for anyone interested in practicing marksmanship skills or just wanting a dependable and fun .22 long rifle.    

4 comments:

Jim Burnes said...

Thanks for sharing the great info on the takedown Ruger. I have been looking at them and now you have me wanting one even more. Thanks again for your review.
Jim

Erindanielle said...

Thanks for the review lady!!! We have an older Ruger 10/22 that we absolutely LOVE, was going to hand it down to the little one but after reading this review might just go get her this!

The Dude said...

Those are cool little weapons, we always called the Bigger Bore Rugers w/ the flat Butt Stocks Boat Oars :)

Tara said...

Oh nice, I cannot wait to get one of these --- birthday idea!